Treatments of Migraine

Treatments of Migraine

Treatments of Migraine

Treatment of Migraine - A variety of drugs have been specifically designed to treat migraines. In addition, some drugs commonly used to treat other conditions also may help relieve or prevent migraines. Medications used to combat migraines fall into two broad categories:

  • Pain-relieving medications. Also known as acute or abortive treatment, these types of drugs are taken during migraine attacks and are designed to stop symptoms that have already begun.
  • Preventive medications. These types of drugs are taken regularly, often on a daily basis, to reduce the severity or frequency of migraines.

Choosing a strategy to manage your Treatments of Migraine depends on the frequency and severity of your headaches, the degree of disability your headaches cause, and your other medical conditions.

Some medications aren’t recommended if you’re pregnant or breast-feeding. Some aren’t used for children. Your doctor can help find the right medication for you.

  • Pain-relieving medications

For best results, take pain-relieving drugs as soon as you experience signs or symptoms of a migraine. It may help if you rest or sleep in a dark room after taking them:

  • Pain relievers.

These medications, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen may help relieve mild migraines. Drugs marketed specifically for migraines, such as the combination of acetaminophen, aspirin and caffeine (Excedrin Migraine), also may ease moderate migraine pain but aren’t effective alone for severe migraines. If taken too often or for long periods of time, these medications can lead to ulcers, gastrointestinal bleeding and rebound headaches. The prescription pain reliever indomethacin may help thwart a migraine headache and is available in suppository form, which may be helpful if you’re nauseous.

  • Triptans.

For many people with migraine attacks, triptans are the drug of choice. They are effective in relieving the pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound that are associated with migraines. Medications include sumatriptan, rizatriptan, almotriptan, naratriptan, zolmitriptan, frovatriptan. Side effects of triptans include nausea, dizziness and muscle weakness. They aren’t recommended for people at risk for strokes and heart attacks. A single-tablet combination of sumatriptan and naproxen sodium has proved more effective in relieving migraine symptoms than either medication on its own.

  • Ergot.

Ergotamine and caffeine combination drugs (Migergot, Cafergot) are much less expensive, but also less effective, than triptans. They seem most effective in those whose pain lasts for more than 48 hours. Dihydroergotamine (D.H.E. 45, Migranal) is an ergot derivative that is more effective and has fewer side effects than ergotamine. It’s also available as a nasal spray and in injection form.

  • Anti-nausea medications.

Because migraines are often accompanied by nausea, with or without vomiting, medication for nausea is appropriate and is usually combined with other medications. Frequently prescribed medications are metoclopramide (Reglan) or prochlorperazine (Compro).

  • Opiates.

Medications containing narcotics, particularly codeine, are sometimes used to treat migraine headache pain when people can’t take triptans or ergot. Narcotics are habit-forming and are usually used only as a last resort.

  • Dexamethasone.

This corticosteroid may be used in conjunction with other medication to improve pain relief. Because of the risk of steroid toxicity, dexamethasone should not be used frequently.

  • Preventive medications

You may be a candidate for preventive therapy if you have two or more debilitating attacks a month, if pain-relieving medications aren’t helping, or if your migraine signs and symptoms include a prolonged aura or numbness and weakness.

Preventive medications can reduce the frequency, severity and length of migraines and may increase the effectiveness of symptom-relieving medicines used during migraine attacks. Your doctor may recommend that you take preventive medications daily, or only when a predictable trigger, such as menstruation, is approaching. That’s some Treatments of Migraine.

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